GOVT 2306 Unit 2
Up Work Samples

 

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Unit 2: Political Behavior

 

 

A.  Read the following selections from the Margin Notes by clicking on each link.

 

B.  Watch these presentations. When you click on one of the links below, a new screen will pop up. Use the scrollbar on the side of the new screen to navigate. You need Adobe Reader to view PDF files.

[Each may take a few minutes to download.]

Public Opinion and Government Responsiveness Part I

Public Opinion and Government Responsiveness Part II

Measuring Public Opinion

The Media Part I

The Media Part II

The Media Part III

 

 

C.  (Optional) Read the following chapters from the textbook.

There are no chapters to read for this unit.

 

D.  The following Optional Links are designed to help you do better in your course but they are not required.

GOVT 2306 Activity #1 Rubric

Blank Political Advertisement Analysis Chart (PDF)

The Negative Consequences of Uncivil Political Discourse (PDF)

What Do You Believe? (PDF)

Rubric for Assessing Candidate Debate Performances

Rubric for Assessing Candidate Speeches

 

LOOK AT THIS!

For every assignment, I've given you a grading rubric.

If you look at the rubrics you will know exactly what I look for when I grade an assignment.

Each assignment's grading rubric will always be under Optional Links on the same unit page as the assignment instructions.

 

E.  Activity #1: Analyzing Political Advertisements (10 points)To Do Note

For this activity you are going to analyze some political advertisements.

Before you actually start your analysis, though, you need some background information.

 

Step #1

To begin, go to the 30 Second Candidate and click on the From Idea to Ad link. In that section of the site, read the information under the following headings.

consultant linkresearch linkscript linkshooting linkfinancing linkad buy linkresults link

 

Step #2

On that same site, click on the Tricks of the Trade link and watch the 11-second basic ad. After you've watched the basic ad, see how the ad changes (and how those changes are made) under both of the following links.

ad FOR this candidate linkad AGAINST this candidate link

 

Step #3

Now go to Propaganda Critic and follow the links to read the descriptions about the following common propaganda techniques.

word games -- name calling, glittering generalities, euphemisms

false connections -- transfer, testimonial

special appeals -- plain folks, bandwagon, fear

 

Step #4

It's time to analyze some political ads. I've chosen 25 political ads for you to watch and analyze. They can all be found at Living Room Candidate. I'll walk you through the first ad from the table below ... you'll be able to handle the rest by yourself.

Look at the table below. From the columns on the left, you can see that the first ad is described as 1952, Dem, 1st, I Love the Gov. On the site, find the list of election years and click on 1952. Now find the row of pictures labeled Democrat and hold your mouse over the 1st picture in the row. You can see the title is I Love the Gov. Click on the picture and that ad will begin to load. Once it's loaded, watch the ad. I want you to enjoy the ads and see how things have changed over time but you also need to keep in mind the various propaganda techniques you read about in step 3. If you think any of those 8 techniques are present in the I Love the Gov ad, check the column under any technique that applies. You're also welcome to come up with a different technique (the other column) if you think it's appropriate for any of the ads.

BLANK POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT ANALYSIS CHART

political ad

name calling

glittering generality

euphemism

transfer

testimonial

plain folk

bandwagon

fear

other

no.

year

party

place

title

1

1952

Dem

1st

I Love the Gov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1956

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

1960

Rep

1st

Most Important Issue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

1964

Dem

2nd

Daisy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

1968

Rep

1st

Convention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1972

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

1976

Rep

last

Pearl  Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

1980

Rep

4th

Safire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

1980

Dem

6th

Bible

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

1980

Dem

7th

Flip Flop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

1984

Rep

5th

Bear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

1984

Rep

last

Peace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

1984

Dem

2nd

Limo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

1984

Dem

6th

Failure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

1988

Rep

last

Willie Horton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

1992

Dem

8th

Morning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

1992

Rep

3rd

Gray Dot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

1992

Reform

1st

Kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

1996

Rep

4th

From the Heart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

2000

Rep

4th

Dangerous World

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

2000

Rep

7th

Hopeful

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

2000

Dem

last

Question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

2004

Rep

1st

Safer, Stronger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

2004

Rep

7th

Changing World

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

2004

Rep

14th

Wolves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

2004

Dem

5th

Optimists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

2004

Dem

last

Heroes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blank Political Advertisement Analysis Chart (PDF)

 

Tip #1 -- You'll need Real Player or Windows Media to watch the ads. If you don't have either, scroll to the bottom of the Unit I page and you'll see links that will take you to sites where you can download free versions of either.

Tip #2 -- Click on the Settings link under the TV to adjust your video preferences. This is especially important if you're having trouble viewing the ads. You might want to play around with the settings until you get the best mix for your computer.

Tip #3 -- Before watching ads from an election year, skim through the brief Overview for that election year so you'll have some idea what was going on during that election. If you'll do that first, the ads will make more sense.

 

Step #5

As you watch the ads, think about the following questions.

Does the ad define the candidate, the issue / issues or the opponent?

Are there connections between the propaganda technique and what the ad defines? For example, does every ad that defines the issues tend to use glittering generalities?

Does the ad convey information or simply attempt to evoke emotion?

Does the ad tend to reinforce prejudices or previously held convictions?

Are there patterns that differentiate the incumbents' ads from the challengers' ads?

What do you think the ad is trying to accomplish? Do you think it is successful?

Do NOT answer each question for each of the 25 ads. Just look for patterns, similarities, differences, etc. Too, keep in mind the date of the ads. A 1952 ad might not impress you much but it may have been cutting edge technology at the time.

 

Step #6

The written response you send to me will be in two parts. Your work should be thorough, specific, include relevant concepts from the course material and be free of spelling and grammar errors. [NOTE: As I've done below, I almost always list the things you need to include in your assignment so you won't miss anything. However, you should never write an assignment as a list unless the instructions specifically tell you to do so. Lists encourage short, quick responses, and they don't usually require much thought or much attention to spelling and grammar. They also won't earn you many points! Instead, write your assignment in complete sentences and paragraphs, using the list only to be certain you cover everything. Do your best to make your writing thorough, thoughtful and organized. Don't try to be concise ,,, Try to be complete.]

1. List the 25 ads and tell me what propaganda techniques (if any) you think each uses.

You may copy and paste the table above (or part of it) or you can simply list the number of the ads (1 through 25), followed by the techniques -- for example, 1 testimonial, 2 plain folks and fear, 3 other (explain), and so on.

Note: There are no right answers to this but there are wrong answers. By that I mean that for almost all of the ads you can make a case for more than one technique any of which I will accept. However, on almost all of the ads there are techniques that clearly do not apply and anyone who has read the definitions of those techniques would know that. For example, I Love the Gov does not use fear no matter how hard you might try to justify that choice.

2. I'd like your answer to the question: Does political advertising have a positive or negative effect on the democratic process? Your answer to that question may be as long or as brief as you want but it must pass two tests.

a. First, your answer must exhibit an understanding of political science concepts. Make specific and detailed connections to course content.

b. Second, your answer must reflect the information given in the assignment, including the sites you were asked to visit. Use what you learned from the assignment to make your case. Too, while I welcome you to include your opinions as part of your comments, those opinions must have some basis in fact. This is the time to demonstrate some critical thinking!

 

Activity Submission Instructions

By the deadline shown in the Course Schedule on the main page of the syllabus:

  • Send your table or list and comments  in the body of a new email to dramyglenn@earthlink.net.

  • Put only your name and Activity #1 at the beginning of your email. (If you read your syllabus, you know that I tend to delete assignments without a name.)

  • Be careful to use the correct subject line. If you are not positive you know the correct subject line, go back and read your syllabus carefully. Emails with incorrect subject lines will not reach me. At best, you'll correct your mistake later and your assignment will be late. At worst, your assignment will never reach me and you'll receive no points for it.

  • Late comments will lose one point per day late, including weekends and holidays.

 


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Copyright 1996 Amy S Glenn   
Last updated:   06/18/2017   1830

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