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Soils and Landforms

Internal Processes

Weathering and Wasting

 

 

 

 

Physical Geography

Characteristics of The Atmosphere

Soil-Forming Factors

Basic Soil Science and Soil Fertility

 

 

 

Properties

 

 

 

Profiles

 

 

 

Pedogenic Regimes

 

 

 

Classification

 

 

 

The Structure of Earth

 

 

 

The Composition of Earth

 

 

 

Landforms

Danxia Land Form, China

 

Bryce Canyon's (Utah) layered red and orange rock pillars, known as hoodoos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOUNT RORAIMA - SOUTH AMERICA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MACHU PICCHU, PERU

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Physical Geography

Internal Processes

Plate Tectonics

This Dynamic Earth: the Story of Plate Tectonics and companion map

[This Dynamic Planet: A Teaching Companion]

The Interior of the Earth

The San Andreas Fault rift zone, near McKittrick CA, is seen on the west side of Temblor Ridge which divides it from the oil fields of the Monterey Shale formation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volcanism

 

Ancient Supervolcano Spewed Rivers Of Ash and Gas Over 100 Miles

 

Crater Lake, Oregon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7-COLORED EARTH - MAURITIUS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLCANIC LAKES IN INDONESIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mount Vesuvius, near Naples, Italy

 

Mount Vesuvius, near Naples, Italy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotopaxi volcano, as seen from Quito, Ecuador

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A large plume of ash and steam rises from the Cotopaxi volcano, as seen from Quito, Ecuador on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015.

The Geophysics Institute said during the first week of October the Cotopaxi has shown an increase in emission of ash and temperature, and a noted glow in the crater.

Cotopaxi began showing renewed activity in April and its last major eruption was in 1877.

Bogoslof Volcano in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A steady stream of lava, called a firehose, suddenly gushed from an underground lava tube at the base of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano and spilled into the Pacific Ocean. As the molten rock met the cooler seawater, steam, sand and chunks of cooled lava were thrown explosively into the air. The impact of these continual bursts of energy eventually created a crack in the 90-foot sea cliff, which expanded over the course of a week until a section of the cliff broke off entirely and sloughed into the sea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folding

 

 

 

Faulting

 

FAIRY CHIMNEYS IN TURKEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Physical Geography

Weathering and Wasting

 

Weathering: Changes that occur in sediments an d rocks when exposed at the earth’s surface

– Changes are physical and chemical

– Atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere all contribute

 

Weathering and Wasting

Rockfall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Movement of small rock fragments pried loose by gravitational stress and/or freeze-thaw processes. We call these types of mass wasting rock falls.

 

Joints in Weathering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joints are important in weathering because they allow for more surface area on which chemical and physical weathering can occur.

A prime example of joints is the columnar basalt at Sheepeater Cliff in Yellowstone.

 

In the evolution of most landforms, mass wasting is the step that follows weathering.

 The combined effects of mass wasting and erosion by running water produce stream valleys. Gravity is the controlling force of mass wasting.

Other factors that influence or trigger down slope movements are saturation of the material with water, oversteepening of slopes beyond the angle of repose,

removal of anchoring vegetation, and ground vibrations from earthquakes.

The various processes included under the name of mass wasting are classified and described on the basis of (1) the type of material involved

(debris, mud, earth, or rock), (2) the kind of motion (fall, slide, or flow), and (3) the rate of movement (fast, slow).

The various kinds of mass wasting include the more rapid forms called slump, rockslide, debris flow, and earthflow,

as well as the slow movements referred to as creep and solifluction.
 

Geologylink - Virtual Field Trips - Cengage

Earthy Links Page

Links SQL: Earth Science/Geology/Miscellaneous/Virtual Field Trips

R.L. Hanna's LifeTime Field List

Field Trips

Geology Resources

American Southwest Images, QTVR (Quicktime) Panoramic Views and links

Arches National Park, Utah

National Park Service: Park Landforms

Tectonic Landforms

Basin and Range: National Parks Listing

Big Bend National Park (Texas)

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

US Physiographic Provinces

Enchanted Rock, Texas

Geology Field Trips

 

Mass Movement

 

  http://www.slideserve.com/Olivia/mass-wasting

 

 

Erosion

Sinkholes are pits in the ground that form in areas where water gathers without external drainage, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

As water drains below ground, it can dissolve subterranean caverns, particularly in areas where the bedrock is made of water-soluble evaporate rocks

such as salt or gypsum or of carbonate rocks such as limestone or dolomite.

"Blue holes" are water-filled sinkholes in caves or in the ocean. http://www.livescience.com/44123-what-are-sinkholes.html

GREAT BLUE HOLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

what remain of quartzite-sandstone mountains after millions of years of water erosion Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Split Pinnacles, Hunan, China   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painted Hills, Oregon

 

Karst Processes

http://www4.uwsp.edu/geo/faculty/lemke/geomorphology/lectures/07_karst.html

 

 

 

Fluvial Processes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desert Processes

 

Huacachina, Peru, located on a desert oasis in the Ica district, has some of the largest sand dunes in the world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glacial Processes

 

 

 

Coastal Processes

 

FINGAL'S CAVE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Copyright 1996 Amy S Glenn
Last updated:   05/01/2019   2300

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